Blog Archive

Thursday, March 30, 2017

The Six Types of Love (According to the Greeks): Eros and Phillia by lotrgifmaker


The Six Types of Love (According to the Greeks)

by Jan 31 2016

The ancient Greeks were sophisticated in the way they talked about love, recognizing six different varieties. They would have been shocked by our crudeness in using a single word both to whisper "l love you" over a candlelit meal and to casually sign an email "lots of love." So what were the six loves known to the Greeks? And how can they inspire us to move beyond our current addiction to romantic love, which has many of us hoping—but often failing—to find a unique soul mate who can satisfy all their emotional needs?
Eros (sexual passion)

Eros (sexual passion)

The first kind of love was eros, named after the Greek god of fertility (aka Cupid), and it represented the idea of sexual passion and desire. But the Greeks didn't always think of it as something positive, as we tend to do today. In fact, eros was viewed as a dangerous, fiery, and irrational form of love that could take hold of you and possess you—think of a Tinder fling you regret. Eros involved a loss of control that frightened the Greeks. Which is odd, because losing control is precisely what many people now seek in a relationship. Don't we all hope to fall "madly" in love?

Philia (deep friendship)

The second variety of love was philia or friendship, which the Greeks valued far more than the base sexuality of eros. Philia concerned the deep comradely friendship that developed between brothers in arms who had fought side by side on the battlefield. It was about showing loyalty to your friends, sacrificing for them, as well as sharing your emotions with them. (Another kind of philia, sometimes called storge, embodied the love between parents and their children.) We can all ask ourselves how much of this comradely philia we have in our lives. It's an important question in an age when we attempt to amass "friends" on Facebook or "followers" on Twitter—achievements that would have hardly impressed the Greeks.